Setting up local https with IIS in 10 minutes

For very good reasons websites now nearly always run under https rather than http. As dev’s though this gives us a complication of either removing any local redirect to https rules and “hoping” things work ok when we get to a server, or setting local IIS up to have an https binding.

Having https setup locally is obviously a lot more favourable and what has traditionally been done is to create a self signed certificate however while this works as far as IIS is concerned, it still leaves an annoying browser warning as the browser will recognise it as un-secure. This can then create additional problems in client side code when certain things will hit the error when calling an api.

mkcert

The solution is to have a certificate added to your trusted root certificates rather than a self signed one. Fortunately there is a tool called mkcert that makes the process a lot simpler to do.

https://github.com/FiloSottile/mkcert#windows

Create a local cert step by step

1. If you haven’t already. Install chocolatey ( https://chocolatey.org/install ). Chocolatey is a package manager for windows which makes it super simple to install applications. The name is inspired from NuGet. i.e. Chocolatey Nuget

2. Install mkcert, to do this from a admin command window run

choco install mkcert

3. Create a local certificate authority (ca)

mkcert -install

4. Create a certificate

mkcert -pkcs12 example.com

Remember to change example.com to the domain you would like to create a certificate for.

5. Rename the .p12 file that was created to .pfx (this is what IIS requires). The certificate will now be created in the folder you have the command window open at.

You can now import the certificate into IIS as normal. When asked for a password this have been set to changeit

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