Tag: CD

Using Sitecore TDS with Azure Pipelines

Sitecore TDS allows developers to serialize Sitecore items into a file format which enables them to be stored in source control. These items can then be turned into a Sitecore update package to be deployed into a Sitecore solution.

With tools like Team City it was possible to install the TDS application on the server, and MSBuild would pick it up in the same way that Visual Studio would when you create a build locally. However, with build tools like Azure Piplelines that are a SAAS service you do not have any access to install components on a server.

If your solution contains a TDS project and you run an Azure Pipeline, you will probably see this error saying that the target 'Build' does not exist in the project.

Fortunately, TDS can be added to a project as a NuGet package. The documentation I found on Hedgehogs site for TDS says the package is unlisted on NuGet.org but can be installed in the normal way if you know what it's called. When I tried this is didn't work, but the NuGet package is also available in the TDS download so we can do it a different way.

Firstly download TDS from Hedgehogs website. https://www.teamdevelopmentforsitecore.com/Download/TDS-Classic

Next create a folder in the root of your drive called LocalNuGet and copy the nuget package from the download into this folder.

Within Visual Studio go to Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Settings, and in the window that opens select Package Sources on the left.

Add a new package source and set it to your LocalNuGet folder.

From the package manager screen select your local nuget server as the package source and then add the TDS package to the relevant projects.

When you commit to source control make sure you add the hedgehog package in your projects packages folder. Normally this will be excluded as your build will try and restore the NuGet packages from a NuGet feed rather than containing them in the repo.

If you run your Azure Pipleine now you should get the following error:

This is a great first step as we can now see TDS is being used and we're getting an error from it.

If you're not getting this, then open the csproj file for your solution and check that there are no references to c:\program files (x86)\Hedgehog Development\ you should have something like this:

<Target Name="EnsureNuGetPackageBuildImports" BeforeTargets="PrepareForBuild">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <ErrorText>This project references NuGet package(s) that are missing on this computer. Use NuGet Package Restore to download them.  For more information, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=322105. The missing file is {0}.</ErrorText>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <Error Condition="!Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" Text="$([System.String]::Format('$(ErrorText)', '..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets'))" />
</Target>
<Import Project="..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets" Condition="Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" />

To fix the product key error we need to add our license details.

Edit your pipeline and then click on the variables button in the top right. Add two new variables:

  • TDS_Key - Which should be set to your license key
  • TDS_Owner - Which should be set to the company name the key is linked to

Now run your pipleline again and the build should succeed

Moving the Media Cache folder in Sitecore

One of the cache’s that Sitecore has is the Media Cache. Whenever you use an image from Sitecore’s media library, Sitecore will retrieve the image from the database, scale it to the size you requested and then store it to disk in the media cache folder. On any subsequent request the image will now be retrieved from the media cache rather than the database.

By default each content management and content delivery server will locate the media cache in /App_Data/MediaCache

This is a relatively logical place to store a cache for images that wont cause you many issues. However, if you have automated deployments setup then you are likely wiping the whole of your website folder each time you do a deploy to ensure that your deploy remains the same on all environments. As the App_Data folder is in the website, your Media Cache will be deleted too.

Depending on your site then deleting the media cache potentially isn’t much of an issue. After all it’s a cache so all that will happen is the images will get cached the next time they are requested. But depending how many images get retrieved at the same time this could slow down performance, particularly if your content editors decided to put every image they ever uploaded into the same folder. Opening the that folder in the admin will create a nice amount of load on your server, particularly if you also have some extra image optimization logic installed.

Like most things in Sitecore though, you can change the location through a config setting.

In Sitecore.config you will find a property called Media.CacheFolder. Change this to somewhere outside of your website folder and Sitecore will now start storing the Media Cache in this location and it will be safe your all your deploys.

<!--  MEDIA - CACHE FOLDER
          The folder under which media files are cached by the system.
          Default value: /App_Data/MediaCache
    -->
  <setting name="Media.CacheFolder" value="/App_Data/MediaCache"/>

Adding Build Statuses to Pull Requests with TeamCity and GitHub

I'm always looking for ways to improve our build server setup and improve our overall efficiency. So a recent change I've made is to get Team City to start building pull requests and pushing the resulting status back to GitHub.

This improves our dev flow by eliminating the need to do any testing on a pull request if we can already see it will fail a build. Previously someone doing a code review would only find out once they've checked out the change and built it locally, or even worse after approving the request and then breaking the build.

What's particularly good with this setup, is it's testing the resulting merge rather than just the branch being merged in.

Team City Setup

As this is covering a different scenario to our normal build processes which are focused on preparing a build version to be deployed, I set this up as a second build configuration on our projects.

Version Control Settings Root (VCS Root)

The VCS Root needs to be configured to fetch each pull request that is creating in GitHub. To do this, you will need to add a Branch specification which will tell Team City to monitor additional branches rather than just the default branch specified.

I'm using the branch specification +:refs/pull/(*/merge) .

This syntax is telling Team City to monitor references to pull for pull request, the * refers to any pull request, and the merge indicates that we only want to resulting merge of the pull request.

When you create a pull request in GitHub, this merge reference is automatically created for what the resulting merge would look like.

In the projects list, builds will now get labels indicating what they were for:

Build Steps

I created my build configurations by duplicating the existing ones we have that take care of creating builds to be passed onto Octopus Deploy for release. If you do this, it's important to remember to disable all the steps you no longer need.

The less steps you have the quicker your build will run and the quicker the pull request will be updated with a status. Ideally you want the process to finish before someone starts doing a code review! Steps like running Inspections may prove counter productive if the builds are never finished on time.

Triggers

Having a build running automatically for your releases can be a drain on server resources, particularly if you never have any intention of actually doing a deploy for most of them. For this reason our builds are set to manual.

However for statuses to be of any use, they're going to need to be running automatically so that the status is ready for the code reviewer, so we need to add a VCS Trigger.

Build Features

To get Team City to start posting status updates back to GitHub we need to add a build feature. If your on a version of TeamCity prior between 7.1 and 10 then there is a plugin you can grab here https://github.com/jonnyzzz/TeamCity.GitHub. If your on a newer version of TeamCity. i.e. 10+ then the build feature is now built in and is called Commit status publisher. The built in version also has support for Bitbucket, Gerrit, GitLab, JetBrains Upsource and Visual Studio Team Services.

Add the build feature and fill in the config settings.

And that's it. Your pull requests will now automatically build and have the status sent back to GitHub.

Not only will you be able to see this status in GitHub, you'll also be able to click a details link to see the build. Useful in the event that it's failed and you want to see why.