Setting up local https with IIS in 10 minutes

For very good reasons websites now nearly always run under https rather than http. As dev’s though this gives us a complication of either removing any local redirect to https rules and “hoping” things work ok when we get to a server, or setting local IIS up to have an https binding.

Having https setup locally is obviously a lot more favourable and what has traditionally been done is to create a self signed certificate however while this works as far as IIS is concerned, it still leaves an annoying browser warning as the browser will recognise it as un-secure. This can then create additional problems in client side code when certain things will hit the error when calling an api.

mkcert

The solution is to have a certificate added to your trusted root certificates rather than a self signed one. Fortunately there is a tool called mkcert that makes the process a lot simpler to do.

https://github.com/FiloSottile/mkcert#windows

Create a local cert step by step

1. If you haven’t already. Install chocolatey ( https://chocolatey.org/install ). Chocolatey is a package manager for windows which makes it super simple to install applications. The name is inspired from NuGet. i.e. Chocolatey Nuget

2. Install mkcert, to do this from a admin command window run

choco install mkcert

3. Create a local certificate authority (ca)

mkcert -install

4. Create a certificate

mkcert -pkcs12 example.com

Remember to change example.com to the domain you would like to create a certificate for.

5. Rename the .p12 file that was created to .pfx (this is what IIS requires). The certificate will now be created in the folder you have the command window open at.

You can now import the certificate into IIS as normal. When asked for a password this have been set to changeit

Redirect to https using URL Rewrite

There’s always been reasons for pages to be served using https rather than http, such as login pages, payment screens etc. Now more than ever it’s become advisable to have entire sites running in https. Server speeds have increased to a level where the extra processing involved in encrypting page content is less of a concern, and Google now also gives a boost to a pages page ranking in Google (not necessarily significant, but every little helps).

If all your pages work in https and http you’ll also need to make sure one does a redirect to the other, otherwise rather than getting the tiny page rank boost from Google, you’ll be suffering from having duplicate pages on your site.

Redirecting to https with URL Rewrite

To set up a rule to redirect all pages from is relatively simple, just add the following to your IIS URL Rewrite rules.

<rule name="Redirect to HTTPS" stopProcessing="true">
  <conditions>
    <add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="^OFF$" />
  </conditions>
  <action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}{REQUEST_URI}" appendQueryString="false" />
</rule>

The conditions will ensure any page not on https will be caught and the redirect will do a 301 to the same page but on https.

301 Moved Permanently or 303 See Other

I’ve seen some posts/examples and discussions surrounding if the redirect type should be a 301 or a 303 when you redirect to https.

Personally I would choose 301 Moved Permanently as you want search engines etc to all update and point to the new url. You’ve decided that your url from now on should be https, it’s not a temporary redirection and you want any link ranking to be transfered to the new url.

Excluding some URL’s

There’s every chance you don’t actually want every url to redirect to https. You may have a specific folder that can be accessed on either for compatibility with some other “thing”. This can be accomplished by adding a match rule that is negated. e.g.

<rule name="Redirect to HTTPS" stopProcessing="true">
  <match url="images" negate="true" />
  <conditions>
    <add input="{HTTPS}" pattern="^OFF$" />
  </conditions>
  <action type="Redirect" url="https://{HTTP_HOST}{REQUEST_URI}" appendQueryString="false" />
</rule>

In this example any url with the word images in would be excluded from the rewrite rule.