Sitecore

Using Sitecore TDS with Azure Pipelines

Sitecore TDS allows developers to serialize Sitecore items into a file format which enables them to be stored in source control. These items can then be turned into a Sitecore update package to be deployed into a Sitecore solution.

With tools like Team City it was possible to install the TDS application on the server, and MSBuild would pick it up in the same way that Visual Studio would when you create a build locally. However, with build tools like Azure Piplelines that are a SAAS service you do not have any access to install components on a server.

If your solution contains a TDS project and you run an Azure Pipeline, you will probably see this error saying that the target 'Build' does not exist in the project.

Fortunately, TDS can be added to a project as a NuGet package. The documentation I found on Hedgehogs site for TDS says the package is unlisted on NuGet.org but can be installed in the normal way if you know what it's called. When I tried this is didn't work, but the NuGet package is also available in the TDS download so we can do it a different way.

Firstly download TDS from Hedgehogs website. https://www.teamdevelopmentforsitecore.com/Download/TDS-Classic

Next create a folder in the root of your drive called LocalNuGet and copy the nuget package from the download into this folder.

Within Visual Studio go to Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Settings, and in the window that opens select Package Sources on the left.

Add a new package source and set it to your LocalNuGet folder.

From the package manager screen select your local nuget server as the package source and then add the TDS package to the relevant projects.

When you commit to source control make sure you add the hedgehog package in your projects packages folder. Normally this will be excluded as your build will try and restore the NuGet packages from a NuGet feed rather than containing them in the repo.

If you run your Azure Pipleine now you should get the following error:

This is a great first step as we can now see TDS is being used and we're getting an error from it.

If you're not getting this, then open the csproj file for your solution and check that there are no references to c:\program files (x86)\Hedgehog Development\ you should have something like this:

<Target Name="EnsureNuGetPackageBuildImports" BeforeTargets="PrepareForBuild">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <ErrorText>This project references NuGet package(s) that are missing on this computer. Use NuGet Package Restore to download them.  For more information, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=322105. The missing file is {0}.</ErrorText>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <Error Condition="!Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" Text="$([System.String]::Format('$(ErrorText)', '..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets'))" />
</Target>
<Import Project="..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets" Condition="Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" />

To fix the product key error we need to add our license details.

Edit your pipeline and then click on the variables button in the top right. Add two new variables:

  • TDS_Key - Which should be set to your license key
  • TDS_Owner - Which should be set to the company name the key is linked to

Now run your pipleline again and the build should succeed

Moving the Media Cache folder in Sitecore

One of the cache’s that Sitecore has is the Media Cache. Whenever you use an image from Sitecore’s media library, Sitecore will retrieve the image from the database, scale it to the size you requested and then store it to disk in the media cache folder. On any subsequent request the image will now be retrieved from the media cache rather than the database.

By default each content management and content delivery server will locate the media cache in /App_Data/MediaCache

This is a relatively logical place to store a cache for images that wont cause you many issues. However, if you have automated deployments setup then you are likely wiping the whole of your website folder each time you do a deploy to ensure that your deploy remains the same on all environments. As the App_Data folder is in the website, your Media Cache will be deleted too.

Depending on your site then deleting the media cache potentially isn’t much of an issue. After all it’s a cache so all that will happen is the images will get cached the next time they are requested. But depending how many images get retrieved at the same time this could slow down performance, particularly if your content editors decided to put every image they ever uploaded into the same folder. Opening the that folder in the admin will create a nice amount of load on your server, particularly if you also have some extra image optimization logic installed.

Like most things in Sitecore though, you can change the location through a config setting.

In Sitecore.config you will find a property called Media.CacheFolder. Change this to somewhere outside of your website folder and Sitecore will now start storing the Media Cache in this location and it will be safe your all your deploys.

<!--  MEDIA - CACHE FOLDER
          The folder under which media files are cached by the system.
          Default value: /App_Data/MediaCache
    -->
  <setting name="Media.CacheFolder" value="/App_Data/MediaCache"/>

Managing Redirects in Sitecore

One of the most important aspects if not the most important aspect to managing a website is SEO. It doesn’t matter how good your website is, it doesn’t really matter if nobody can find it. Creating good SEO is a lot about having pages match what users are searching for, which then results in a high ranking for those pages. However, a second part to this formula is what happens with a page when it no longer exists. For instance, one day this blog post may no longer be relevant to have on our site, but up until that point search engines will have crawled it, people will have posted links to it and all of this adds to its value which we would to lose should it be removed. An even simpler scenario could be that we rename the blog section to something else and the page still exists under a different URL, but links to it no longer work.

Fortunately, the internet has a way of dealing with this and it’s in the form of a 301 redirect. 301 redirect are an instruction to anyone visiting the URL that the page has permanently moved to a different URL. When you set up a 301 redirect it achieves two things. Firstly, users following a link to your site end up on a relevant page rather a generic page not found message. Secondly search engines recrawling your site update their index with the new page and transfer all the associated value. So, to avoid losing any value associated with a page, whenever you move, rename or remove a page you should also set up a redirect.

Sitecore

Given how important redirects are it’s then surprising that an enterprise CMS platform like Sitecore doesn’t come with a universal way to set redirects up out of the box.

Typically, when we’ve taken over a site one of the support requests we will eventually receive is a question surrounding setting up a redirect from a marketer who’s ended up on Sitecore’s documentation site and is confused why they can’t find any of the things in this article https://doc.sitecore.com/users/sxa/17/sitecore-experience-accelerator/en/map-a-url-redirect.html.

The article appears to suggest that creating redirects is a feature that is supported, however it’s only available to sites built using Sitecore Experience Accelerator rather than the traditional approach.

More often that not, the developers who created the site will have added 301 redirect functionalities but will have done it using the IIS Redirect module, which while serves the purpose of creating redirects does not provide a Sitecore interface for doing so.

301 Redirect Module

Fortunately, there are some open source modules available which add the missing feature to Sitecore. The one we typically work with is neatly named 301 Redirect Module.

Once installed the module can be found in the System > Modules folder. Clicking on the Redirects folder will give you the option to either create another Redirect Folder to help group your redirect into more manageable folders, Redirect URL, Redirect Pattern or Redirect Rule.

This is by far the most common redirect to be set up. You specify an exact URL that is to be redirected and set the destination as either another exact URL or a Sitecore item. There’s even an option to choose if it should be a permanent or temporary redirect.

Redirect patterns are slightly more complex and require some knowledge of being able to write regular expressions. However, these are most useful if you ever want to move an entire section of your site. Rather than creating rules for each of the pages under a particular page, one rule can redirect all of them. Not only does this save time when creating the redirects, but it also makes your list of redirects far more manageable.

Auto Generated Rules

One of my favourite features of the 301 Redirect Module is that it can auto generate rules for any pages you move. For instance, if you decide a sub-page should become a top-level page moving it will result in a rule automatically being generated without you having to do a thing.

Summary

A marketer’s ability to manage 301 Redirect is as important as them being able to edit the content on the site and while traditional Sitecore sites may be missing this functionality it can easily be added using 3rd party modules, best of all they’re free!