Equivalent of the Octopus Package Library for Azure Devops

I’ve been using Team City and Octopus deploy in our CI setups for several years, but over the last 6 months have slowly been moving over to use Azure Devops. This is mostly to move away from needing to keep an application like Team City updated by switching to a SAAS service. Octopus is available as a SAAS service, but as Azure Devops is also capable of doing releases I opted to start with that rather than using Octopus again.

One of my first challenges was how you replace Octopus’s package library. The solutions I’m working on (which are generally Sitecore based), consist of the application we write and store in Source Control, and all the other pre-built parts of Sitecore which we don’t store in source control.

With Octopus deploy we would add these static parts to the Octopus package library and then release a combination of them and our application to a server, wiping what is there before we do. That then gives us the exact same deploy on every target.

With Azure Devops however, things are a bit different.

Azure Artifacts

The closest equivalent of the package library is Azure Artifacts. Rather than a primary purpose being to upload packages to be included in a deploy. The goal of Artifacts is more inline with the output of a pipeline being saved to an Artifact which can then be a package feed for things like NuGet or npm.

Unfortunately, there is also no UI to directly upload a NuGet package to an Artifact feed like there is with Octopus’s package library. However, it is possible to upload a pre-built NuGet package another way using NuGet.exe itself.

Manually uploading a NuGet package to Azure Artifacts

To start you need to create a feed for your package to uploaded to.

Login to Azure DevOps and got to Artifacts. Click Create feed and give it a name.

Click connect to feed and select NuGet.exe. You will see under the heading project setup a nuget.config file to add to your solution.

Create an empty solution in Visual Studio and add a nuget.config file to the root folder using the source from the website. It will look something like this;

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <packageSources>
    <clear />
    <add key="MyFeed" value="https://pkgs.dev.azure.com/.../_packaging/MyFeed/nuget/v3/index.json" />
  </packageSources>
</configuration>

Copy the NuGet package you would like you publish into the root folder as well. I’m using a package we have created for a tool called Feydra. My folder now looks like this.

Before we can publish into our NuGet feed we need to setup a personal access token. This is done from within Azure Devops.

In the top right corner click the person icon and then select profile. On the profile screen you will see a section called Personal access tokens under Security.

From here click New Token and give it the Read, write & manage permission for Packaging.

You will be given a token which you should save a copy of.

Now we are ready to publish are NuGet package to the Artifact feed.

Open a command prompt at the folder containing your solution file and run the following commands

nuget push -Source <SourceName> -ApiKey az <PackagePath>

For me this is as follows:

nuget push -Source MyFeed -ApiKey az .\Feydra.Custom.1.0.0.30.nupkg

You will then be prompted for a username and password which you should use the personal access token for both.

Refresh the feed on the website and you should see you package added to it, ready to be included in a release pipeline.

Using Sitecore TDS with Azure Pipelines

Sitecore TDS allows developers to serialize Sitecore items into a file format which enables them to be stored in source control. These items can then be turned into a Sitecore update package to be deployed into a Sitecore solution.

With tools like Team City it was possible to install the TDS application on the server, and MSBuild would pick it up in the same way that Visual Studio would when you create a build locally. However, with build tools like Azure Piplelines that are a SAAS service you do not have any access to install components on a server.

If your solution contains a TDS project and you run an Azure Pipeline, you will probably see this error saying that the target ‘Build’ does not exist in the project.

Fortunately, TDS can be added to a project as a NuGet package. The documentation I found on Hedgehogs site for TDS says the package is unlisted on NuGet.org but can be installed in the normal way if you know what it’s called. When I tried this is didn’t work, but the NuGet package is also available in the TDS download so we can do it a different way.

Firstly download TDS from Hedgehogs website. https://www.teamdevelopmentforsitecore.com/Download/TDS-Classic

Next create a folder in the root of your drive called LocalNuGet and copy the nuget package from the download into this folder.

Within Visual Studio go to Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Settings, and in the window that opens select Package Sources on the left.

Add a new package source and set it to your LocalNuGet folder.

From the package manager screen select your local nuget server as the package source and then add the TDS package to the relevant projects.

When you commit to source control make sure you add the hedgehog package in your projects packages folder. Normally this will be excluded as your build will try and restore the NuGet packages from a NuGet feed rather than containing them in the repo.

If you run your Azure Pipleine now you should get the following error:

This is a great first step as we can now see TDS is being used and we’re getting an error from it.

If you’re not getting this, then open the csproj file for your solution and check that there are no references to c:\program files (x86)\Hedgehog Development\ you should have something like this:

<Target Name="EnsureNuGetPackageBuildImports" BeforeTargets="PrepareForBuild">
    <PropertyGroup>
      <ErrorText>This project references NuGet package(s) that are missing on this computer. Use NuGet Package Restore to download them.  For more information, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=322105. The missing file is {0}.</ErrorText>
    </PropertyGroup>
    <Error Condition="!Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" Text="$([System.String]::Format('$(ErrorText)', '..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets'))" />
  </Target>
  <Import Project="..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets" Condition="Exists('..\packages\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.6.0.0.10\build\HedgehogDevelopment.TDS.targets')" />

To fix the product key error we need to add our license details.

Edit your pipeline and then click on the variables button in the top right. Add two new variables:

  • TDS_Key – Which should be set to your license key
  • TDS_Owner – Which should be set to the company name the key is linked to

Now run your pipleline again and the build should succeed

Azure devops and custom NuGet feeds

If your setting up a CI pipleline on Azure Devops for a site which uses a NuGet feed from a source that isn’t on nuget.org you may see the error:

“The nuget command failed with exit code(1) and error(Errors in packages.config projects Unable to find version…”

On your local dev machine you will have added extra an extra NuGet feed source through visual studio which will update a global file on you machine. However as Azure Pipelines is a serverless solution you don’t have the same global file to update to include the sources.

Instead of this you need to add a NuGet.config file to the root of your repository.

Here is an example of one set to include Sitecores NuGet package feed.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<configuration>
  <packageSources>
    <add key="nuget.org" value="https://www.nuget.org/api/v2/" />
    <add key="Sitecore NuGet v2 Feed" value="https://sitecore.myget.org/F/sc-packages/" />    
  </packageSources>
</configuration>

Next you will need to update your pipeline to tell the NuGet step to use this config file

- task: NuGetCommand@2
  inputs:
    restoreSolution: '$(solution)'
    feedsToUse: 'config'
    nugetConfigPath: 'NuGet.config'

And that’s it. As long as all the sources are correct the NuGet command should now find your packages.

Config file transforms with Azure Devops

For a long time now our primary CI setup has been based around Team City and Octopus deploy, but as reliable as it is there are things I don’t like about it:

  1. It’s not a SASS setup meaning there’s a VM to occassionaly think about and updates to install. While Octopus is now availiable as a SASS option, Team City is not and moving Octopus will only solve half the problem.
  2. That VM they both sit on every so often gets and issue with it’s hard disk being full.
  3. It’s complicated to recommend the same setup to clients. You end up having to go through multiple things they need to buy which then require some installation and ongoing maintenance. Ideally we would have a setup thats easy for them to replicate and own themselves with minimal maintenance.

So when we took over a site recently that typically came with no existing CI setup in place, I decided to take a look at using Azure Devops instead. You can use Azure Devops with Octopus Deploy but as it claims to be able to manage releases as well as builds we went for doing the whole thing just in Azure Devops.

Getting a build set up was relatively straight forward so I’m going to skip past that bit, but in short we ended up with a build that will create a web deploy package and publish it as an artifact. Typical msbuild type stuff.

File transforms and variable substitution

The first real tricky point came with replacing variables in config files during a release to each envrionment. We were using the IIS Web App Deploy task to deploy the application to IIS on a VM (no new Azure Web App Services in this setup 😦 as I said we took over the site and this was just to get automated deploys of what they already have). A simple starting point with this is some built in functionality for XML Variable Substituion in the IIS Web App Deploy task.

Quite simply you can add all your varibles to the variable list, set the scope for which envrionment you want it to apply to and the during the deploy they are replaced in your config. Unlike some tag replacement tools I’ve used in the past this one actually uses the name of the connecting string or app setting you need to set, so if you need to set a connection string named web, the variable name will be web.

This is also where my problem stated. The description for what XML variable substitution does is:

Variables defined in the build or release pipeline will be matched against the ‘key’ or ‘name’ entries in the appSettings, applicationSettings, and connectionStrings sections of any config file and parameters.xml

This was a Sitecore solution and for Sitecore most of your config settings are in Sitecores own Sitecore section of the config file. So in other words the connection string will get updated but the rest won’t.

Parameter and SetParameter XML files

My next issue was trying to find a solution is actually quite hard. Searching for this problem either gave me a lot of results for setups using ARM templates (as I said, this was a solution we took over and that kind of change is not on the agenda), or you just get the easy bit above. Searching for Sitecore and Azure Devops also leads you to a lot of results on a cloud infrastructure setup (again not what we’re doing here, at least in the short term). Everything that was coming up felt far more complicated than the solution should be.

However the documentation on the XML variable substitution did have one interesting sentance.

If you are looking to substitute values outside of these elements you can use a (parameters.xml) file, however you will need to use a 3rd party pipeline task to handle the variable substitution.

A parameters.xml file isn’t something I’ve used before which makes this sentance a bit cryptic. The first half says I can do what I want with an xml file, but the second half says I’ll need something else to actually do it.

After a bit of reasearch this all comes back to web deploy. When you do a build that outputs a web deploy package, you get 5 files.

A zip file containing the actual site, a command file which has the script to do the deploy and a set parameters file which is used to set config variables during the deploy. The others aren’t so imporant.

To have different config set on different envrionments you just need to edit the set parameters file. But first you need to have the parameter in the set parameters file so that you can actually change it and this is where the parameters.xml file comes in.

Creating the parameter files

Add a file called parameters.xml file to the root of your project and then add parameters as follows.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<parameters>
  <parameter name="DataFolderLocation" defaultvalue="#{dataFolder}">
    <parameterEntry kind="XmlFile" scope="App_Config\\Include\\Z.Project\\DataFolder\.config$" match="/configuration/sitecore/sc.variable[@name='dataFolder']/patch:attribute/text()" />
  </parameter>
</parameters>

Some important parts:

default valueThe value that the config setting will get set to
scopeThe path to the file containing the setting
matchAn XPath expression for find the part of the config file to update

Once you have this the build will start producing a SetParameters.xml file containing the extra parameters.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<parameters>
  <setParameter name="IIS Web Application Name" value="Default Web Site/SiteCore.Website_deploy" />
  <setParameter name="DataFolderLocation" value="#{dataFolder}" />
</parameters>

Note: I’ve set the value to be something I intend to replace in the release process.

Replacing the tokens

With our SetParameters.xml file now contining all the config we need to update, we need a step in the release process that will replace all the tokens with the correct values.

To do this I used a replaced tokens task https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=qetza.replacetokens

Config options need to be set for:

Root DirectoryPath to the folder containing the SetParameters.xml file
Target filesA list of files to have replacements done in. In our case this was SiteCore.Website.SetParameters.xml
Token prefixThe prefix on tokens to be search for. Ours was #{
Token suffixThe suffix to denote the end of a token. Ours was }

Lastly in the IIS Web App Deploy step the SetParameters file needed to be selected and the new variables added to the variable list in Azure Devops. The variable names need to be called the bit between your prefix and suffix. i.e. #{datafolder} would be called datafolder.

If you don’t set the variables then the log’s will show warning for each one it couldn’t find.

2019-09-24T17:17:21.6950466Z ##[section]Starting: Replace tokens in SiteCore.Website.SetParameters.xml
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831695Z ==============================================================================
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831783Z Task         : Replace Tokens
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831816Z Description  : Replace tokens in files
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831861Z Version      : 3.2.1
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831891Z Author       : Guillaume Rouchon
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831921Z Help         : v3.2.1 - [More Information](https://github.com/qetza/vsts-replacetokens-task#readme)
2019-09-24T17:17:23.9831952Z ==============================================================================
2019-09-24T17:17:27.2703037Z replacing tokens in: C:\azagent\A1\_work\r1\a\PublishBuildArtifacts\SiteCore.Website.SetParameters.xml
2019-09-24T17:17:27.3133832Z ##[warning]variable not found: dataFolder
2019-09-24T17:17:27.3179775Z ##[section]Finishing: Replace tokens in SiteCore.Website.SetParameters.xml

With all this set our config has it’s variables configured within Azure Devops for each envrionment,